Scale and polarisation in mobile

There are lots of ways to look at the global handset industry, but the polarisation evident in this chart is pretty compelling. Not shown - the hundreds of 'other' manufacturers, mostly in China.

The CFO of Qualcomm recently described the industry as a barbell - Apple and Samsung at one end, then the smaller and mostly sub-scale players (though some, such as Sony, are showing signs of increased health, albeit from a low base), and then at the other end, invisible, the Chinese. 

As an aside, this also illustrates the way that Apple has become so cyclical that it's really only the December quarter that gives a good directional steer.  

Lumia and BB10

Interesting to compare the replacement of the legacy platforms with the 'future saviour' platforms at RIM and Nokia. Neither is going terribly well.

Screen Shot 2013-06-28 at 15.50.16.png
Screen Shot 2013-06-28 at 15.50.49.png

Of course, the underlying problem is that though both platforms are perfectly OK (though with their flaws), they're radically sub-scale. iOS now has about 400m active devices (iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch, though obviously with overlapping users) and Android over 800m, plus China. Lumia and BB10 combined have sold a little over 23m units in the last 18 months.  As a developer, why would you target these?

It's also interesting to ponder what would have happened if both companies had swallowed their pride and gone with Android, or even forked Android. I don't actually think Blackberry would be in a better position, but Nokia might have been. 

BBM and the rest

Blackberry gave a few operating metrics for BBM today as part of their developer event, at which they stated BBM will go onto iOS 6 and Android ICS+. There are: 

  • 60m active users
  • 51m using it for 90 minutes a day (definition unclear)
  • 10bn messages a day (sent and received)

Blackberry claims that this is 'nearly twice' the message/user/day volume of any other platform, but this isn't quite true: on a sent-and-recieved basis BBM does 167 but Whatsapp does around 100. On a sent basis (assuming a 50/50 split), Kakao does 56 and BBM does 83. 

The two charts below give a somewhat impressionistic sense of the landscape. These are just the biggest players, and the definitions are variable. WeChat has stated 190m active users as opposed to 300m registered: Whatsapp says 'over 200m' actives. In total, there are several billion accounts on all of the services out there (with massive duplication, of course): I've lost count of how many such services there are in total. 

Screen Shot 2013-05-14 at 3.58.32 PM.png
Screen Shot 2013-05-14 at 5.02.39 PM.png

BBM is now one of many such services, and not the biggest any more. Cross-platform may not be enough. 

(Note - I updated the second chart after Blackberry said it is quoting 10bn messages as both sent and received Link)